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    list($69.99)
    1. Nokia 5165 Phone (AT&T)
    list($79.99)
    2. Nokia 3360 Phone (AT&T)
    list($49.99)
    3. Motorola V60g Phone (T-Mobile)
    list($149.99)
    4. Nokia 8260 Phone, Electric Blue
    list($99.99)
    5. Samsung R225 Phone (T-Mobile)
    list($49.99)
    6. Nokia 1260 Phone (AT&T)
    list($149.99)
    7. Nokia 6360 Phone (AT&T)
    list($49.99)
    8. Motorola T193 Phone (T-Mobile)
    list($99.99)
    9. Nokia 3390 Phone with AOL (T-Mobile)
    list($249.99)
    10. Motorola V60t Phone (AT&T)
    list($149.99)
    11. Nokia 8260 Phone, Cobalt Gray
    list($49.99)
    12. Nokia 6190 Phone (T-Mobile)
    list($59.99)
    13. Mitsubishi T250 Phone (AT&T)
    list($49.99)
    14. Ericsson A1228LX Phone (AT&T)
    list($99.99)
    15. Ericsson T18LX Go Everywhere Phone
    list($79.99)
    16. Motorola M3682 Prepaid Phone (T-Mobile)
    list($199.99)
    17. Samsung SCH8500 Phone, Charcoal
    list($79.99)
    18. Ericsson LX700 Prepaid Phone (AT&T)
    list($149.99)
    19. Sprint PCS Touchpoint 2200 Phone
    list($99.99)
    20. Ericsson R280LX Phone (AT&T)

    1. Nokia 5165 Phone (AT&T)
    by Nokia
    list price: $69.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B000056ETF
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Nokia
    Sales Rank: 2047
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    Nokia's new 5165 phone is a worthy successor to the company's hallmark 5160i, one of today's most popular phones. Like its predecessor, the new Nokia is a lightweight personal phone with impressive talk and standby times that's loaded with classic, simple-to-learn features. Its changeable faceplates, 30 different ringers (and room for five downloadable tones), and an expansive world of accessories add up to a fun general-purpose phone. The addition of predictive T9 text input, wireless business cards, and e-mail capabilities make it a business communications tool as well. The 5165's dual-band/trimode operation ensures you'll be able to receive cellular service anywhere it's available. Like Nokia's other AT&T phones, this model does not support Web browsing.

    Weighing in at 6.2 ounces (including battery), the highly portable 5165 measures 5.2 inches high, 1.85 inches wide, and 1.2 inches deep, not counting a stubby antenna that extends another 0.7 inches. Extremely rugged, it should stand up well to being thrown into bags and briefcases or occasionally dropped.

    Four buttons handle most menu navigation: a hefty "Navi" key in the middle, up and down arrow buttons that control volume during calls, and a key marked "C" for "clear". Menu navigation is very intuitive. A tap of the Navi key brings up the first of a series of graphical menu items. Hit Navi again for additional menu options, or tap the up or down arrow keys to select a different menu. Top-level menu choices are a phone book, messages (SMS and voice-mail alerts), call log, settings (for calls, phone, and security), system, games (Memory, Snake, and Logic), clock, tones, and keypad lock. The brightly backlit display works well with the control keys to simplify finding and making choices. In text mode, the phone provides five 16-character lines.

    The 5165 lets you choose from 30 preprogrammed ringer tones. You can also download an additional five from your service provider's Web site, if applicable. Although there's no internal vibration mode, an optional vibrating battery is available. You can store electronic business cards in your phone book. Any friend or associate can forward his or her name, number, and e-mail address to your phone, and you can automatically store the information with some deft menu navigation.

    One caveat regarding faceplates: In theory, all 5100-series faceplates should work with this phone, but in practice, only Nokia-brand faceplates seem to work. The problem is the keypad, the thin rubber pad inside the phone on which the actual keys are mounted. We tried several different faceplate models (both Nokia-branded and after-market models) and found the 5165's original keypad will not accommodate non-Nokia faceplates.

    The 5165 supports the usual array of call and messaging features. If the services are supported by your carrier, you can use this phone with caller ID, call waiting, call forwarding, and voice-mail alerts. A call history stores the last 10 numbers dialed, the 10 most recently received calls, and the last 10 missed calls. The phone supports two-way SMS text messaging, but isn't WAP- or Internet-enabled.

    The 5165 offers four basic security features: an initial security code, a keypad lock, call-restriction modes, and a lock code that can activate or deactivate memory and menu options. The lock-code feature lets you store numbers in a secret unlocked location, allowing you to make calls even if the phone is locked.

    The 5165's NiMH battery is rated to last up to 180 minutes of digital talk time and 200 hours of digital standby time. In our testing, we achieved 180 minutes of digital talk time and over 225 hours of digital standby time.

    Overall, Nokia's 5165 is a noteworthy and reasonably priced addition to its 5100-series phones. Choose your favorite faceplate color and ringer tone and start dialing! --Brown Consulting Associates & Thom Arno

    Pros:

    • Changeable faceplates
    • Portable; intuitive to use
    • 5-line screen
    • Huge range of Nokia and third-party accessories

    Cons:

    • Lacks standard vibration mode
    • Not Web-enabled

    How We Tested Battery-Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phone battery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables, including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency (including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, and battery-charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handset manufacturers and mobile-phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings, they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer to the times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery-life ranges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience at least the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital and analog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, as analog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone. Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to the manufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phone on, established a digital-carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and, when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook. When all went well, we simply recorded the time when the phone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped the calls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately and continued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged the battery, and restarted the test. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength, this test should represent best-case talk time. It's worth noting the talk-time performance of several phones significantly exceeded the manufacturers' ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established a carrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone every few hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out. As no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing, and because the phone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, again assuming consistent carrier-signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • Simple-to-use navigation buttons and graphical screens
    • Large 5-line screen
    • Changeable faceplates allow personalization
    • E-mail and wireless business-card capabilities
    • Up to 180 minutes of talk time and 200 hours of digital standby time; includes NiMH battery, charger, and headset

    Reviews (3)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Nice old-fashioned cell phone
    It's a little unfair to compare this phone to the latest and greatest, since it's a very old model at this point.I wanted to say that I used this phone for several years without changing to a new phone or getting a new battery, despite the huge leaps in technology.Only this last year did I finally cave in to get a tri-band phone so I could use it on vacation in another country.That is because if you don't need the new-fangled bells and whistles, this phone is extremely durable (dropped innumerable times and kept on ticking) and very easy to use.You can lock the keys so that accidental presses don't dial a number when you least expect it.The navi key and other shortcut keys perform every function with the least amount of key presses possible and it's easy to remember.My new phone is the Motorola V300 and its menu system is much too complicated and cumbersome in comparison to my old Nokia, a result of trying to accomodate all the features in too evenhanded a manner.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Cell Phone In The World
    The Nokia 5165 is without a doubt the most sturdy and reliable phone on the market today. The 5165 has won numerous awards for reliability and durability. The cell phone industry has rated the Nokia 5165 "as one of the best cell phones out there." The 5165 is highly recommended.

    1-0 out of 5 stars this phone blows chunks
    so this was my first phone received last summer and since then ive wanted to throw it into the ocean everyday.it constantly husts off while you're talking if you move the phone just slightly.things crack and snap way too easily-ive gone through several faceplates beacuse the phone couldnt even withstand a drop form my bed to my carpeted floor.it has no features whatsoever,its impossible to hear even with the volume all the way up, and just recently it has started fluctuating between headset and test mode (???), allowing me to be unable to make nay sort of phone call.AVOID THIS PIECE OF GARBAGE AT ALL COSTS!!! ... Read more


    2. Nokia 3360 Phone (AT&T)
    by Nokia
    list price: $79.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005RHFM
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Nokia
    Sales Rank: 1924
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    Hot on the heels on the ubiquitous 8260, Nokia has introduced the 3360, a fun, shapely phone with several new features, including picture messaging and changeable front and back faceplates.Truly, there aren't many other phones under $100 that can match the 3360's design, components, and overallvalue.

    Here's the tale of the tape: the 3360 measures 4.4 by 1.9 by 0.8 inches, and it weighs 4 ounces. This means the phoneis slightly longer than a business card and weighs the same as today's ultracompact phones. It also has an internal antenna--whichpeople either love or hate--though we never had trouble with call reception. To us, everything about this phone isexecuted correctly; the keypad is well-spaced, it has salient features (even though it can't access theInternet wirelessly), and it's inconspicuous while in use.

    Three buttons handle most of the menu navigation: a central oval-shaped key activates the main menu and lets you selectoptions as they appear; the roller-bar navigation key scrolls through menu options; and the "C" (clear) button jumps backa step and erases text-entry mistakes.

    Menu choices are: Phone Book, Messages (SMS and voice-mail alerts), Call Log,Profiles (so you can choose how your phone behaves in different environments), Settings (for calls, phone, and security),Forwarding, Games, Calculator, Calendar, Composer (for DIY ring tones), and Keyguard Lock. With the backlit, five-linedisplay (three lines of text, two lines of icons and indicators), we found it easy to navigate through menus and make selections. And here's a definite design improvement on the 8260: the 3360's power button, located on top ofthe phone, is raised a bit so it's easier to use (and find).

    Like other phones, the 3360 has a full roster of call and messaging features. If offered by your service plan, it supportscaller ID, call waiting, SMS, voice mail, numeric paging, multiparty calling, and e-mail. Call logs maintain the last 10dialed numbers, 10 most recently received calls, and 10 missed calls. PIM functions includea clock, currency converter, calculator, calendar with room for 50 appointments and reminders, and a 250-entry phonebook.

    But, as we said, the 3360 offers a couple of new features (at least for Nokia phones). We logged on to AT&T Wireless's site from our PC so we could download additionalring tones. The 3360 also has eight preset images you can e-mail to your friends--but in order to take advantage of it both people need to have a 3360 that supports picture messaging. You can also download additional images from AT&T Wireless' site, provided your service plan supports this action.

    The front and back faceplates are separate, so you can have a two-tone phone if you desire.It was a minor challenge to remove the faceplate on the first try, but it was worth the effort. And while the phone's included gamesweren't enough to take us away from PlayStation 2, we enjoyed Space Impact (sort of Defender meets SpaceInvaders), one of the 3360's four new games. It also features Snake II, Bantumi, andPairs I.

    The 3360 offers five basic security features: an initial phone lock, keypad lock, call-restriction modes,and the ability to change access codes at any time.

    The NiMH battery is rated for up to 160 minutes of digital talk time and 7.5 days of digital standby time. In ourtests, we got the phone to hold a call for just about three hours, and it lasted for a full seven days in standby mode.

    We highly recommend the 3360, and we don't want to give our sample phone back. It looks different from the rest of the herd and has the features we want and need on a daily basis--all for under $100.

    --Arno Kazarian

    Pros:

    • Innovative design
    • Picture messaging and voice-activated dialing
    • Competitively priced
    • Changeable front and back faceplates
    • Streamlined menu navigation
    • Space Impact game

    Cons:

    • No Web browser capability
    • Removing faceplate is tricky

    ... Read more

    Features

    • E-mail capability helps you keep in touch
    • Changeable faceplates allow you to customize your phone
    • Infrared port lets you beam data to or from another device
    • Up to 240 minutes' digital talk time and 10.5 days' digital standby time
    • Includes NiMH battery, charger, and hands-free headset

    3. Motorola V60g Phone (T-Mobile)
    by Motorola
    list price: $49.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006LIQE
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Motorola
    Sales Rank: 1647
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com Product Description

    Compatible with T-Mobile cell phone service, the durable V60g provides you with Internet access, text messaging, high speed data download, and more, all displayed on a 4-line, backlit, 96 x 64 pixel, black and white screen.

    For calling, the v60g includes voice mail and a dedicated voice mail button and icon, plus call timers, redial, missed call indicator, call log, any-key answer, auto-answer, auto-redial, speed dial, mute control, no-answer transfer, one-touch 911, vibrating ring, differential ring, ringer profiles, and a phone book capacity of 500 entries. There's also 32 different ringtones and a built in ring tone composer. When you get online, you can enjoy SMS two way messaging, text messaging and text templates, and iTap predictive text assistance. High speed data download is accomplished via GPRS, and a PIM is include for getting yourself organized. Games built in to the phone include Blackjack, Mindblaster, and Paddleball.

    The v60g weighs 4.3 oz. and measures 4.11 x 1.81 x 0.83 inches. Its batteries are rated at 160 minutes talk time and 120 hours standby time.

    What's in the Box
    v60g phone, battery, phone, travel charger, holster, user documentation ... Read more

    Features

    • External caller ID
    • Solid, sleek flip construction
    • Voice-activated dialing
    • Up to 4 hours' digital talk time and 6 days' digital standby time
    • Includes battery, charger, and headset

    4. Nokia 8260 Phone, Electric Blue (AT&T)
    by Nokia
    list price: $149.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B000050ZFE
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Nokia
    Sales Rank: 1951
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Features

    • Striking design
    • E-mail and 2-way paging capabilities
    • Full set of PIM functions
    • Up to 3.5 hours of digital talk time and 8 days of digital standby time with standard battery
    • Weighs 3.1 ounces with battery; includes Lithium-ion battery, charger, and Nokia hands-free headset

    5. Samsung R225 Phone (T-Mobile)
    by Samsung
    list price: $99.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006LIQB
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Samsung
    Sales Rank: 1875
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com Product Description

    Overview

    Compatible with T-Mobile cell phone service, the Samsung R225 features a variety of features such as a color-coordinated phone book, a Internet browser, picture caller ID, and plenty of phone and organizer features displayed on a 128 x 64 pixel, black and white backlit LCD screen.

    Calling Features

    Used simply as a phone, the R225's calling features include call timers, redial, missed call indicator, call log, any-key answer, auto-redial, roaming indicator, speed dial, phonebook look-up, phonebook scroll, mute control, no-answer transfer, usage alert, vibrating ring, differential ring and a phone book capacity of 250 entries. Each entry can be assigned one of four colors for your enjoyment.

    Internet

    This phone lets you get online and access e-mail, popular Web sites, and download ring tones and data. There's also 2-way text messaging with text templates, plus three games: Casino, Mole, and Hexa.

    Organizer

    Organizer features include voice memo, scratch pad, a calendar, and a to-do list.

    Vital Statistics

    The Samsung R225 weighs 3.4 ounces and measures 4.3 x 1.8 x 0.9 inches. Its Lithium Ion batteries are rated at up to 250 minutes talk time, and up to 120 hours standby.

    What's in the Box
    R225 phone, charger, battery, strap, hands-free headset ... Read more

    Features

    • Easy to use phone with high contrast blue display
    • Two-way text messaging
    • Compose your own ring tone melodies
    • Up to 4 hours' digital talk time, 120 hours' digital standby time with standard battery
    • Includes travel charger, owner's manual, and earbud.

    Reviews (35)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Really really like my phone
    I've had this phone for two years now and I really really like it.

    So the ring tones are a little high pitched. Whatever. The important thing is that I get clear reception, light weight, and long battery life. It is easy to use - the buttons feel good to me and the menus are intuitive. The blue backlight is also really nice. Sometimes I use it as a flashlight in the dark!

    The one issue I have had is that once in a while when I speed dial a number, it somehow changes who I'm calling to a different number. Not sure why or how that happens, but it is so infrequent its not a problem.

    I don't need a camera phone or bluetooth, so this has been great phone for me. In fact, I have the option of upgrading to something new right now, and I'm reluctant to swap it out! :)

    3-0 out of 5 stars worth the money
    I never did want to take my time to write a review for anything, but now after I read the comment by Mr. David H. about this phone, I just have to throw out some opinions as well.

    This phone's setting and navigation system are quite simple to figure out. Here is how you can set or adjust the clock:
    Menu --> Organizer --> Clock

    Basically I don't have any problem with this phone, including its ringtones. The reason I give it only 3 stars out of 5 is that although its small size makes it look nice and easy to carry around, all the keys are placed too close to one another, which makes it a bit hard to punch a # while driving. Also, internet capability would be nice to have.

    I recommend this phone to anyone who just wants a phone that works great, with a reasonable price, and doesn't care much for new technology, i.e. internet capability, bluetooth, and camera.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Good basic phone
    I think that this phone works perfectly fine if your looking for a basic cell. I havent had any problems with it, and it has good reception as well as clear voices. If your looking for a basic phone, this phone is great.

    1-0 out of 5 stars What A Turd!
    Dear Consumer,
    Run for your very life.I am the bewildered owner of this crappy cell phone.This device is the modern equivalent of, well, (insert your favorite torcher device here.) The heinous organization and navigation of the phone book, and the various settings menus is enough to make your teary with insanity.Even the ring tones (when the phone actually rings that is) are horribly ear piercing.Friends call and the neighborhood dogs cower.You even have to set the clock on the phone, WTF?!(I know clock setting my sound like a crappy gripe, but it was impossible to figure out how to set the clock.) Oh yeah, and don't expect to make more than one call on a charge because two minutes into your second call you will be deafened by the chime that ends your call as the battery falls as dead as a bucket of fried chicken.

    2-0 out of 5 stars terrilbe
    i hate this phone you cant get a screensaver or id pics and the ringtones are terrible. even if you download one off the internet. it just sounds annonying. ... Read more


    6. Nokia 1260 Phone (AT&T)
    by Nokia
    list price: $49.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00007HFN2
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Nokia
    Sales Rank: 2235
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Features

    • E-mail capability helps you keep in touch
    • Downloadable ringtones allow you to customize your phone
    • Internal antenna, picture messaging, and predictive text entry.
    • 3.75 hours talk time, 10.5 days standby time
    • Includes NiMH battery, charger, headset and user documentation

    7. Nokia 6360 Phone (AT&T)
    by Nokia
    list price: $149.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B000068WQF
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Nokia
    Sales Rank: 2406
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com Product Description

    Compatible with AT&T cell phone service, the Nokia 6360 features Internet connectivity, mobile messaging, infrared data send, and more, all displayed on a high quality, black and white LCD screen.

    For calling, you'll enjoy custom ring tones, multiple number entry per name in your 500-entry phone book, a dedicated voice mail button and indicator. There's also voice dialing, voice commands, call timers, redial, missed call indicator, call log, any-key answer, auto-redial, speed dial, mute control, one-touch 911, and usage alert. Nokia also supports TTY/TDD (Telecommunication Device for the Deaf) compatibility with phone adapter (adaptor not included).

    To help you get organized, the 6360 includes a 5000 event calendar, a calculator, 3 minutes worth of voice memo capability and more. You can wirelessly send information to your PC via the infrared capability (with Nokia PC Suite, sold separately). Get online, and in addition to access to stock quotes, weather, movie times, (and more), you'll also enjoy mobile text messaging with text templates and predictive assistance, plus and numeric paging, downloadable ring tones, and five games included with the phone: Snake II, Racket, Pass 'n Rush, Space Impact, and Pairs II. The 6360 weighs 5.8 oz. and measures 5.2 x 1.9 x 1 inches. Its batteries are rated at 120 minutes talk time and up to 96 hours standby

    What's in the Box
    Nokia 6360 phone, standard battery charger, extended 1000 mAh LiIon battery, charcoal battery cover, hands-free headset (ear bud) ... Read more

    Features

    • E-mail capability
    • Internal antenna
    • Infrared port
    • Up to 5.2 hours digital talk time and 14 days digital standby time
    • Includes Li-Ion battery, charger, and hands-free headset

    Reviews (11)

    3-0 out of 5 stars A very good phone, if growing very outdated
    This is a solid phone all around.It doesn't have a color screen, it doesn't have a camera, it doesn't have wireless bluetooth technology or the hottest games around, but what it does do it does very well.It has very good audio quality and good singal strength.It is all around a great phone, but does little else but act as a great phone.For someone who doesn't need lots of fancy features and just wants to be able to make calls, this is a good deal.

    4-0 out of 5 stars good phone
    this is a good phone. it is lightweight and compact, has 5 built-in games, a voice memo recorder, and voice activated dialing & commands. you can download up to 20 ring tones, store up to 500 contacts with up to 5 numbers and 4 text entries per contact in the phonebook. you can also stay connected with up to 5.2 hours of talk time and up to 376 hours of standby time.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Solid Phone
    My first digital phone was a Motorola DPC-950 in 1996

    I've had this phone for over a year (two?) and have to say it is well made. I've dropped this thing on the floor, the road, the desk, probably more than 30 times

    It has no color display, no fancy ringtones. But it DOES have an external antenna jack, and combined with a little magnetic mount 10 inch tall cell phone antenna on my car and a cable ran through the trunk I love this thing on road trips. Coverage in the boonies with the antenna ($40) is superb.

    It ain't fancy, but if what you want is a phone that makes and receives calls this is a good phone. It is TDMA.

    1-0 out of 5 stars Amazon is great.. phone is great, just say away from AT&T
    WARNING: AT&T representatives ("Dawn: R361" and "Max: N360") themselves said during my troubleshooting (as detailed below) that I should NOT have bought through Amazon, and that they have received a barrage of complaints from Amazon buyers!I still really like Amazon, but they're integration with AT&T is non existent.People should not have to wait 2-3 days for service after they receive the phone.Buy the same phone on Amazon, but a different carrier.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Greatest sound and Coverage in a Cell Phone
    I love this phone.It is sturdy, won't break or come apart if dropped, is very feature rich for the business or home user.
    I never have experienced an inability to get service even in the remote mountains of Colorado, and the fields of Kansas and Texas when I travel.Crystal clear reception, when my friends newer, next generation phones don't work, I hand them mine.
    Excdellent! ... Read more


    8. Motorola T193 Phone (T-Mobile)
    by Motorola
    list price: $49.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005S3P0
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Motorola
    Sales Rank: 2555
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Features

    • Blazing wireless Internet-connection speeds
    • Voice-activated dialing
    • Six-line display
    • Up to 300 minutes' digital talk time, 150 hours' digital standby time
    • Includes NiMH battery, charger, and headset

    9. Nokia 3390 Phone with AOL (T-Mobile)
    by Nokia
    list price: $99.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00006LIPV
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Nokia
    Sales Rank: 1855
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com Product Description

    Compatible with T-Mobile cell phone service and pre-loaded with AOL Instant Messenger service, the Nokia 3390 also features Internet connectivity, picture messaging, voice-activated dialing, and more, all displayed on a high quality backlit black and white LCD screen.

    For calling, you'll enjoy call timers, redial, missed call indicator, call log, any-key answer, auto-redial, speed dial, mute control, one-touch 911, usage alert and a phone book capacity of 250 entries. Nokia also supports TTY/TDD (Telecommunication Device for the Deaf) compatibility with phone adapter (adaptor not included).

    Get online with AOL, and in addition to access to stock quotes, weather, movie times, and more, you'll also enjoy instant text messaging and numeric paging, downloadable ring tones, and four games included with the phone: Space Impact, Snake, Bantumi, and Pairs II. A PIM is included along with a calculator to help you manage time and finances. The 3390 weighs 5.3 oz. and measures 4.5 x 1.94 x 1.02 inches. Its batteries are rated at 300 minutes talk time and up to 360 hours standby

    What's in the Box
    Nokia 3390 phone, battery, AC charger, hands-free earbud headset, user documentation ... Read more

    Features

    • Loaded with AOL Instant Messenger
    • Changeable faceplates
    • Picture messaging, Voice-activated dialing
    • Up to 160 minutes' digital talk time and 7.5 days' digital standby time
    • Includes NiMH battery, charger, and hands-free headset

    Reviews (14)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great cellphone
    i had this cellphone for a year but then i got rid of it not because there was anything wrong with it but because it wasnt color which i really wanted to try out. that was the biggest mistake ever because tmobile has one of the best services out there i am now stuck with sprint which no one should get because it absolutly sucks

    5-0 out of 5 stars I wish I still had it....
    I recently traded in my 3390 for a Samsung x105. I got rid of it because the battery was dying and I wanted to try out some of the new technology. My Nokia, though 3 years older, compares quite favorably to my new one. I rarely missed a phone call due to the non-polyphonic ring tones. The sound normally stuck out so I could often hear it upstairs and over a blaring radio. The vibration feature is powerful so I always felt it. Overall, it was simple to use and practical. Newer phones often have so many useless features, that it actually takes away from the phone. I miss this phone. Aside from the dying battery, I have no major complaints about the 3390.

    I'm definitely looking to buy another Nokia in the future. Hopefully it will live up to the same standard.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The BEST!
    This is the best phone I have ever used.Even though we have so many new phones in the market.This phone still can compete with them.A cell phone shold work like a phone not as a camera or anything.
    If you are looking for best performance phone then go for it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars A good phone with enough to offer
    Iv'e had this phone for a little over a year now and only recently have iv'e been getting problems with it. The problems are when your in a call the phone will just hang up or all of a sudden get a bad echo which gets irritating. I probably cause the problems though after countless droppings, getting stepped on and much more. The phone works great has games for those who plays them, has IM for when you want to text somebody. So yea it has a little more than the essentials of a phone. You can customize it by changing faceplates or even downloading a tone or two. So yea I do recomend it if you want a phone that you dont want to worry bout getting a hit or two like these new color screen phones. I really dont know why you want a phone to half the stuff that they do and there so fragile I already know three people who broke the screen on those phones and in my opinion are just more trouble than there worth. STAY WITH THE BASICS YOU'LL LIKE THIS PHONE!!!

    5-0 out of 5 stars One of the nice phone from Nokia
    Well NO matter what someone says it's one of the best phone from Nokia. I agree very basic .. not fancy stuff like camara and GPRS and WAP but it got AOL messenger.
    I had this phone for 2 years and it works great ... battery time is still very good. perfact voice quality .. good network coverage ... what else you need ... from a basic phone. ... Read more


    10. Motorola V60t Phone (AT&T)
    by Motorola
    list price: $249.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00005U5TC
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Motorola
    Sales Rank: 1728
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    Sporting a silver aluminum casing and a sturdy flip design, the trimode Motorola V60i combines an intuitive user interface with handy features such as caller ID, voice-activated dialing, and SMS messaging, making it an excellent choice for basic day-to-day business use. With theV60i, Motorola kept all that was good with its predecessor, the V60t, and added some impressive upgrades such as interchangeable faceplates, the option to download ringers, as well as a few new games.

    Tiny is the trend these days, and the V60i fits right in, measuring a minute 4.11 by 1.81 by 0.83 inches, and weighing only 3.4 ounces. Once the phone is flipped open, it feels quite small, but still is remarkably comfortable to use, regardless of the size of your hands.

    At first glance, we were struck by the phone’s stylish exterior. Constructed of a lightweight aluminum, the casing feels solid, but not clunky. The casing is also highly resistant to scratching, unlike the plastic design of similar counterparts, and held up very well when we dropped it on an office floor.

    The external LCD screen is another welcome feature, with caller ID alerts that did not require flipping the phone open. The headset jack is on the very top edge of the phone, a nice touch that keeps the headset cord untangled during use. With a special stereo radio headset from Motorola (sold separately), the phone can access FM radio. Compared to other phones this size, the V60i’s stub antenna did seem a bit large, making it difficult to slip the phone into a pocket comfortably.

    Once we flipped the phone open and hit the power button, it took only six seconds for the phone to power up completely, the oval-framed four-line screen revealing improved graphics and quick access to the phone book and message menus. The keypad is comfortably designed, with the keys nicely spaced and just slightly raised, making for fumble-free dialing, while still maintaining the phone’s thin profile. Some phones tend toward top-heaviness when open, but the V60i is nicely balanced--a definite bonus for the thumb-dialers out there. Such balance is also important for accurate use of the phone’s side panel buttons. The buttons on the left side of the phone control call and ring volume, including the ability to discreetly silence a call or switch the phone to vibrate during a meeting. The button on the phone’s right side controls two different voice features. A quick press of the button activates voice dialing, while a press-and-hold move activates the voice recorder.

    Three buttons below the screen and just above the numeric keypad basically control the phone. The key under the left corner of the screen gave us quick access to the phone book, and pressing the right key brought up the phone’s message menu, which keeps a listing of voice mail, text messages, and e-mails close at hand. The centrally located Up/Down key made scrolling the phone’s menu simple, and we were able to choose from a list of seven options fairly easy. That said, browsing the menu is not overly intuitive, and while this new interface was designed to give the user the ability to customize the menu to his or her needs, it could still use a bit of improvement. It took us quite awhile to figure out how to set up the voice-activated calling and short-cut features. How to delete a name from the address book was a mystery for longer than we’d like. Once we got voice-activated dialing set up, it was fun to use, and the sound was crystal clear, allowing us store up to 20 names for voice-activated dialing. The shortcut feature was new to us, and involved preprogramming a number or voice command that connects directly to any item on the phone’s menu, such as the date book or phone book. We were able to create a shortcut after some practice, programming the "1" key as the hot key to access the date book. We also recorded the word "date book" as a voice command to reach the same feature. By taking the time to sit down and preprogram the phone with similar shortcuts, and combined with the use of a headset, the V60 becomes almost completely hands-free.

    The V60i also features a handful of other tools tailored for the business user. Besides text messaging, voice mail, and e-mail, it also works as a memo recorder. The voice-notes program lets you record notes to yourself, and the notes are saved for your aural perusal whenever you need them. To record a voice note, we pressed and held the button on the right side of the phone, and we were able to record a 20-second message. The phone is can hold about two minutes of voice notes, which is fine for recording ideas on the way to the office. Many of the phone’s personalization features, including the short cuts, quick-dial programming, date book, and even the ring settings, seem ideally suited for use in the business world. Our phone included 26 different ring tones, ranging from beeps, to sonatas, to funk (we were fond of the Uh-Oh ringer), along with five vibrate patterns to help you silently differentiate between voice mails, text messages, and calls. The V60i includes PIM functionality, and you can buy the TrueSync software and cable from Motorola to synch info on your phone with the calendar and phone book on your Windows PC. The one major business tool missing from the V60i is a wireless Web browser.

    The V60i’s battery life was consistent with Motorola’s guidelines of 240 minutes of digital talk time, and 190 hours of digital standby time--good battery usage for a phone of this caliber. With no games or Web browser to drain the battery, charging the phone is a pleasantly rare occurrence.

    On the whole, we find the Motorola V60i a solid, practical phone, ideal for the business user, and a refreshing addition to the AT&T Wireless phone family.

    --Heather Campbell

    Pros:

    • Stylish, yet sturdy design
    • External LCD screen with caller ID
    • Menus customizable to suit user
    • Voice-activated dialing and shortcut features
    • Capable of e-mail and SMS messaging

    Cons:

    • No wireless Web browser
    • Bulky antenna

    How We Tested Battery Talk/StandbyTime

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phone battery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables,including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency (including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, and battery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handset manufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings, they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer to the times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery life ranges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience at least the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital and analog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, as analog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone. Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to the manufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phone on, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and,when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook. When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when the phone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped the calls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately and continued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged the battery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength, this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting that several phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers' ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established a carrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone everyfew hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out. Since no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because thephone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, again assuming consistent carrier signal strength.

    ... Read more

    Features

    • External display allows you view text without opening the phone
    • Voice-activated dialing lets you dial a number without touching the keypad
    • Text messaging support lets you send and receive short messages
    • Up to 4 hours' digital talk time and 6 days' digital standby time
    • Includes battery, charger, and headset

    11. Nokia 8260 Phone, Cobalt Gray (AT&T)
    by Nokia
    list price: $149.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004Y87X
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Nokia
    Sales Rank: 1760
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    With the introduction of its striking 8260 digital phone, one of the hottest new handsets on the market, Nokia sets a new standard for eye-catching style and extreme portability.

    Great looks by themselves don't make a phone, but the 8260's style does not come at the expense of substance. We were impressed with its robust construction, nice fit and finish, and easy-to-navigate controls. The 8260 also boasts dual-band/trimode electronics, a newly designed internal antenna, excellent talk and standby times, and a host of sophisticated functions including e-mail and two-way SMS capabilities. The only real missing feature is Web-browsing support.

    Where did this tiny phone come from? Essentially, Nokia updated the electronics and boosted the antenna power of its high-end classic, the 8860; put the new design in a sleek, tiny package; and significantly lowered the price. The 8260 also borrows the easy navigation and ease of use that is a hallmark of its popular 5100-series phones.

    Although many of the 8260's features are available in other premium phone models, its design is like nothing you've ever held. Weighing a mere 3.4 ounces and measuring 4.1 by 1.75 by 0.75 inches, the 8260 literally fits in the palm of your hand.

    The side-mounted volume-control keys were easy to operate while on a call, and we hooked up a hands-free kit to the headphone jack so we could stow the phone in our pocket while having conversations. One caveat: the tiny power button, located on top of the phone, is almost flush with the casing and hard to find. You won't be likely to turn the phone on inadvertently, but at times it was a challenge to turn the phone on at all. Other than this quibble, the 8260 is a joy to use.

    Three buttons handle most of the menu navigation: a roller-bar navigation key lets you scroll through menu options, and two additional buttons let you select menu options as they appear. The right prompt button also provides one-touch access to your phonebook. The top-level menu choices are: Messages (SMS and voicemail alerts), Call Log, Profiles (so you can choose how your phone behaves in different environments), Settings (for calls, phone, and security), System (so you can select a service provider or opt for automatic selection), Games (Rotation, Memory, Snake, and Logic), Calculator, Calendar and Keyguard Lock. The backlit, three-line display works well with the control keys, and we found it easy to locate menus and make selections. Despite the phone's small size, the keypad is well spaced, and we had no problems dialing with one hand.

    The Nokia 8260 has a full roster of call and messaging features. If offered by your service plan, it supports caller ID, call waiting, two-way SMS, voicemail, numeric paging, multiparty calling, and e-mail. Three different call logs maintain the last 10 dialed numbers, 10 most recently received calls, and 10 missed calls. PIM functions include a clock, currency converter, calculator, calendar with room for 50 appointments and reminders, and a 250-entry phonebook. There is no standard method of connecting the 8260 to a PC or other device.

    A few more cool things worth noting: The 8260 has three-NAM capability, so you can route three different numbers to the phone. Its built-in vibrating alert guarantees you will get your calls without annoying the people sitting next to you. And we have to mention Nokia's new game, Rotation. Most phone games are pretty lame, but this organizational puzzle can actually raise your pulse.

    The 8260 offers four basic security features: An initial security code, keypad lock, call restriction modes, and a lock code that can activate or deactivate memory and menu options. One nice thing about the lock-code feature is you can store numbers in a secret unlocked location, which will allow you to make calls even if the phone is locked.

    The 8260's lithium-ion battery is rated to last for a maximum of 210 minutes of digital talk time and 192 hours of digital standby time. In our battery testing (using the 8260 with AT&T service), it came impressively close. We held an open call for just over three hours, and the phone lasted for nearly eight days in standby mode. These are impressive numbers for any phone, but especially for one of this size and weight.

    In sum, the 8260 is one of the lightest, smallest, most stylish phones around, and it backs up its cool appearance with solid construction and functions. Unless you need a phone with a minibrowser, this unit is an excellent match for almost any personal or professional communications need.--Thom Arno, edited by Tom Mace

    Pros:

    • Tiny size, stylish case
    • Solid construction, intuitive use
    • E-mail and 2-way SMS capable, built-in PIM
    • Impressive battery life

    Cons:

    • No browser capability
    • Hard-to-locate power button

    How We Tested Battery-Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phone battery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables, including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency (including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, and battery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handset manufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings, they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer to the times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery life ranges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience at least the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital and analog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, as analog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone. Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to the manufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phone on, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and, when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook. When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when the phone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped the calls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately and continued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged the battery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength, this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting that several phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers' ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established a carrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone every few hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out. Since no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because the phone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, again assuming consistent carrier signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • Striking design
    • E-mail and 2-way paging capabilities
    • Full set of PIM functions
    • Up to 3.5 hours of digital talk time and 8 days of digital standby time with standard battery
    • Weighs 3.1 ounces with battery; includes Lithium-ion battery, charger, and Nokia hands-free headset

    12. Nokia 6190 Phone (T-Mobile)
    by Nokia
    list price: $49.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004W4BC
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Nokia
    Sales Rank: 5642
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    Nokia's 6190, the GSM model in the company's 6100-series of cellular phones, is a direct descendant of the hugely popular Nokia 5190. We found it to be lighter, handier, and more feature-filled for only a modest increase in price. While the two phones have many features in common, including a 250-number phonebook, 35 ringer tones, and impressive rated battery life, the sky-colored 6190 we tested (provisioned by VoiceStream Wireless) offered a lot of extras. The slimmer case, easy-to-use graphical menus and navigation buttons, and advanced customization features including user profiles and calling groups, make the 6190 a great choice for people who want a reasonably priced handset with something extra for business and personal calls.

    At 5.8 ounces and 5.2 by 1.9 by 1 inches, with a stubby 0.8-inch antenna, the 6190 is a bit slimmer and lighter than the 5190. In addition to the numeric keypad, the phone has Talk and End buttons, two smart buttons that work with onscreen prompts, a two-way toggle navigation button, and volume control buttons along the left side. The backlit display lights up for 15 seconds whenever you touch a key. Unlike the 5190, Nokia 6190 doesn't have a removable faceplates, (or at least faceplates that are officially removable, although you can do it with a screwdriver at the expense of voiding your warranty). And as a bonus, however, the 6190 is shipped with a Jabra EarSet for hands-free use.

    Like all GSM phones, the 6190 uses a carrier-provided SIM card that defines all call provisioning and features. (Basically, this little chip holds your entire cellular personality including your phone number; you can even use it in another GSM phone.) Specific features of your phone depend on your carrier and plan, but the 6190 supports caller ID, call waiting, call forwarding, voice-mail alerts, broadcast news and messages, and two-way SMS text messaging.

    In addition to being able to store 250 numbers, the phone lets you assign each phone-book entry to a group that has a distinctive ringer style, so you'll know if someone from work or school is calling before you answer the phone. Although there's no standard vibration mode, a vibrating battery pack is available.

    The 6190 has the same calculator and alarm clock found in the 5190, but adds a calendar mode so you can set reminders for calls, meetings, birthdays, and other events. For each event, you can enter text and set alarms. The 6190 also has four games, one more than the 5190, although none of them will keep you on the edge of your seat.

    Standard security features include card, phone, and keypad locking; restricted calling modes for incoming and outgoing calls; and monthly calling charge limits. While the 6190 doesn't include standard connectivity cables, an optional data kit enables fax and data transfer.

    The 6190's standard NiMH battery is rated for a maximum 300 minutes' digital talk time and 225 hours' digital standby time. In real-world testing, our sample phone held a call for 275 minutes and lasted for 210 hours in standby mode, an impressive result. A step up in features and a step down in weight from the Nokia 5190, the Nokia 6190 combines ease of use with powerful customization features. Overall it's a rugged little phone that's a pleasure to use. --Testing and evaluation by Brown Consulting Associates, edited by Thom Arno

    Pros:

    • Smaller, lighter, more features than the original 5190
    • Capacious phone book with calling groups
    • 35 ringer tones
    • Long battery life

    Cons:

    • Lacks standard vibration mode
    • Not Web enabled

    How We Tested Battery Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phone battery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables, including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency (including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, and battery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handset manufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings, they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer to the times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery life ranges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience at least the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital and analog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, as analog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone. Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to the manufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phone on, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and, when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook. When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when the phone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped the calls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately and continued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged the battery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength, this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting that several phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers' ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established a carrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone every few hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out. Since no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because the phone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, again assuming consistent carrier signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • Moderate size and lightweight
    • An upgraded 5190 with smaller, lighter case and more features
    • 35 ringer tones and 250-name phone book
    • Up to 300 minutes' talk time, 225 hours' standby time with standard battery
    • Includes Jabra EarSet, NiMH battery, and charger

    13. Mitsubishi T250 Phone (AT&T)
    by AT&T
    list price: $59.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004W4BE
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: AT&T
    Sales Rank: 7994
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    Although we have a slight quibble about this phone's overall performance, the Mitsubishi T250 is still a suitable phone for Web use. Its generous 10-line screen (8 lines of text) and quadmode technology, combined with AT&T's PocketNet service, makes for good surfing. And with a tap of the Mode button, you can toggle between Web and phone features. While the phone's processor seems a bit sluggish and its battery life isn't the greatest, if you are looking for data phone, the T250's Web features may whet your appetite.

    The T250 operates as a quadmode TDMA phone for voice calls, and it provides access to Internet and data services over the CDPD network, a packet-based wireless IP network. It measures 5.6 by 2.2 by 1.0 inches and weighs 7.1 ounces including battery. Even though its design is reminiscent of earlier cellular phone models, the T250 is well balanced and highly portable. The battery clips on and off easily, and the headset jack is located on the right side.

    The Menu and Express navigation keys are located right in the center of the phone. The Express key is also doubles as a shortcut to voice-mail and text-message mailboxes. As you scroll through menu options, prompts appear over the Left and Right Softkeys. You use these keys to execute any action displayed on the screen. Press and hold the Mode key to power the phone on or off; or press it lightly to toggle back and forth between voice and data modes. The T250 also provides Send, End, and Clear keys, and features a generally well-designed keypad.

    The T250's 10-line, backlit-indigo screen is better than that of any phone we have seen, and it allows you to see your entire range of options without much navigation. The menu provides a standard set of options: You can log on to the Web wirelessly, set caller preferences, check on your phone's status, enable a variety of security features, access your phonebook, and more. While the menu itself is set up well, the phone's processing speed seemed surprisingly slow. We experienced sluggish reaction times with almost every task we tried, from scrolling through phonebook entries to navigating the Web.

    The phonebook holds up to 99 names and numbers. You can manage your phonebook entries by assigning any of the four ringer melodies to them. (This way, you know who's calling by the sound of the ringer.) When we updated our phone book, we noticed the T250 alternated unpredictably between standard alphabetical entry and a T9 entry mode. Also, the T250's ringer was barely audible even at full volume.

    If secure usage is one of your hot buttons, the T250's authenticated and encrypted data transmission, wireless fraud protection, and electronic locking features are sure to please. To enter this menu, you are required to enter your security code. Then, you can set different call restrictions, lock codes, clear any phone-book or call-log numbers, and reset your browser cache.

    The T250's data port is located at the bottom of the unit. Using a standard data cable, we found it simple to tether the T250 to our PC. The modem installation procedure, handled by our computer, took less than five minutes, and the user manual is designed to walk even a first-time user through all the steps without fail. Once we were in sync, we could swap phonebook information, text messages, and e-mails back and forth. Except for the phone's generally slow response times, navigating the Web was enjoyable.

    The T250's NiMH battery is rated for 120 minutes' digital talk time and 120 hours' of digital standby time. Our own battery testing produced somewhat mixed results. We could not confirm the talk-time rating, as we never got a call to hold longer than an hour despite testing in an area with strong AT&T service. The phone did last for five days in standby mode, but we noticed significant battery loss if we performed the simplest functions, and everyday calling drained the battery quickly. If you are serious about owning this phone, we highly recommend purchasing an additional battery for your peace of mind.

    Unquestionably, the phone has the best screen we've seen and some technically advanced features, but the T250 seems to have as many quirks as it has advantages.

    --Thom Arno

    Pros:

    • Best screen available today
    • Web access
    • Quadmode TDMA technology

    Cons:

    • Inaudible ringer
    • Sluggish processor
    • Comparatively fast battery drain

    How We Tested Battery Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phone battery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables, including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency (including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, and battery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handset manufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings, they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer to the times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery life ranges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience at least the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital and analog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, as analog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone. Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to the manufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phone on, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and, when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook. When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when the phone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped the calls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately and continued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged the battery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength, this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting that several phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers' ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established a carrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone every few hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out. Since no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because the phone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, again assuming consistent carrier signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • Quadmode TDMA technology
    • Superb 10-line indigo-backlit screen
    • Web enabled
    • Balanced design and construction
    • Up to 120 minutes talk time and 120 hours standby time with standard battery; includes NiMH battery and charger

    14. Ericsson A1228LX Phone (AT&T)
    by Ericsson
    list price: $49.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004W4BF
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Ericsson
    Sales Rank: 9339
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    If portability and convenience are paramount interests, and you don't need a phone for Internet access, the Ericsson A1228LX is worth checking out. This dual-band, trimode TDMA phone may lack voice-activated dialing and other bells and whistles, but it's an attractive, well-designed phone with solid call-management features at a tempting price.

    The A1228LX measures 5.1 by 2 by 1 inches and weighs 6.1 ounces, making it a manageable, highly portable phone. The backlit display shows three lines of text, bright well-organized menus and a full host of indicators to keep you in step with the phone's operation. The A1228LX features Ericsson's intuitive Yes/No button navigation with a rocker bar that lets you scroll through menu options and call logs.

    Built-in call-management features include a 20-number incoming and 40-number outgoing call lists, 25 ringer options, 99 speed-dial locations, one-button dialing for up to nine phonebook numbers, two separate credit-card dialing locations, and a series of call timers. The phone lacks a scratch pad memory, so you can't store phone numbers while you are on a call.

    The A1228LX does have Short Messaging Service (SMS) and fax capabilities, with one-button callback for numbers embedded in text messages. SMS is a handy feature; we used our sample phone (provisioned by AT&T Wireless), to make a movie date and tell friends we were running a bit late. While not as advanced as e-mail, SMS is just as useful in many situations. Provided your service plan supports it, A1228LX also offers caller ID, call forwarding, call waiting, and other popular call-management services.

    On the connectivity front, the A1228LX will sync with Ericsson's own phone-book manager accessory, as well as other PIMs. While the A1228LX isn't really designed to support high-end business use, it's a lot easier to manage your phone book and contact lists on the PC rather than trying to enter text on the phone.

    The A1228LX is equipped with standard security features: a personal security code, keypad lock, and selectable outgoing- and incoming-call restrictions. It also includes voice encryption and authentication capability, which prevents airtime fraud.

    Our sample's battery performance was admirable. The NiMH battery achieved four hours' digital talk time and 135 hours' digital standby time, which matched up with Ericsson's ratings.

    While the A1228LX isn't the most advanced phone around, it's an attractive, straightforward unit with a price to match. If you simply want to manage personal voice calls and send text messages, the A1228LX can deftly handle both. --Thom Arno

    Pros:

    • Excellent display and navigation
    • Exceptional talk and standby times

    Cons:

    • Not Web enabled
    • No scratch pad

    How We Tested Battery Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phone battery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables, including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency (including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, and battery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handset manufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings, they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer to the times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery life ranges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience at least the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital and analog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, as analog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone. Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to the manufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phone on, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and, when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook. When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when the phone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped the calls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately and continued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged the battery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength, this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting that several phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers' ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established a carrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone every few hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out. Since no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because the phone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, again assuming consistent carrier signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • Trimode technology
    • Highly portable
    • Well-organized menus and navigation
    • SMS capable
    • Up to 4 hours digital talk time and 135 hours digital standby time; includes NiMH battery and rapid charger

    15. Ericsson T18LX Go Everywhere Phone (AT&T)
    by Ericsson
    list price: $99.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004W4BG
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Ericsson
    Sales Rank: 5743
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    The Ericsson Go Everywhere T18LX phone may not represent the pinnacle ofwireless technology, but it's a substantial, relatively lightweight phone thatis packed with personalized call management options. If you simply can't livewithout wireless Internet access, you will want to look elsewhere. But if youare looking for an otherwise versatile, feature-rich phone that can act as anextension of your office, read on.

    The T18LX is a TDMA tri-mode phone thatoffers both dual-mode and dual-band capabilities. We were immediately impressedwith its solid construction, flip keypad cover, and efficient design. Weighingin at 5.4 ounces (including battery), the T18LX measures 4.2 by 1.9 by 0.9inches, not counting a stubby antenna that extends another 1.2 inches. Thismoderate-weight, ultracompact design makes the T18LX easy to carry. Its solidconstruction should also hold up well to a variety of daily traumas.

    Theuncluttered keypad features yes/no buttons, which, along with the up/downarrows, allow for seamless menu navigation. The CLR button corrects mistakes andbrings you back to the main screen when you are done cruising the menus. Theflip keypad cover, side volume keys, and backlight and contrast controls add tothe T18LX's well-planned design and ease of use. However, the screen itself istiny--we mean, really tiny. While it's fine for making calls and even receivingshort text messages, any complex text entry or navigation would be unpleasant.Perhaps, then, Ericsson did us all a favor by not equipping the T18LX with aminibrowser.

    The 250-name phone book has 10 group lists, including threecustomized lists. The 25 different ringers are standard. You can also assign aringer to any group, so you'll know right away if someone from work, school, or one of your friends is trying to get in touch with you.

    As any goodcellular phone should, the T18LX supports carrier-dependent services such asshort text messaging (15 message capacity), caller ID, and voice mail. The "1"key provides one-touch access to your voice mail, and the phone allows for one- touch callback to numbers imbedded in text messages or pages. Standard 40-numbercall logs, both incoming and outgoing, are a useful reference, while the twocalling-card slots will prove valuable to anyone who makes a lot of long- distance calls. Other features that will please mobile professionals and otherbusy people are auto area, which lets you program a default area code, speeddial, one- or two-digit calling that corresponds to the positions of your phonebook entries, and super dial, one-touch access to your first nine phone bookentries. Auto retry, when enabled, repeats a call every 15 seconds for threeminutes if the cellular system could not connect the call. Throw in any-keyanswering, muting capabilities, scads of standard customizable tones and alerts,and built-in vibrating call alert, and the T18LX can do battle with just aboutany rival.

    While the T18LX doesn't incorporate any truly unusual features,digging into the phone's options reveals some clever user preferences to playwith. The profiles menu lets you customize phone settings for nine differentenvironments, so the phone will ring quietly at work, or loudly at the airport.And, if your carrier supports it, system select lets you prioritize and selectthe systems from which you can obtain service. This can be especially handywhile roaming or if you have access to more than one mobile system. Normallywhile roaming, the T18LX first looks for service on a public network, thenprivate, and finally residential. However, system select lets you change thepriority of the system for which your phone searches.

    The T18LX offers theusual security settings, including PowerOn lock, keypad lock, and lock dial,which limits outgoing calls to your specifications. SecurityCode, which lets yourestrict access to calling-card numbers and other functions, and erase all,which wipes out all your saved text messages, offer additional peace of mind.You can also restrict access to phone book entries, although you can't erase thephone book memory in one fell swoop. The T18LX also supports digital voiceencryption, to ensure that only you and the person you're talking to can hearthe conversation. This feature is carrier-dependent as well, so check with yourservice provider to make sure it is supported.

    The T18LX doesn't feature aminibrowser, which may cause some to lose interest. However, you can use thephone as a wireless modem with your PC or PDA to swap phone book information, aswell as send or receive data faxes, upload or download files, and make Internetcalls on the mobile network. Your carrier and plan must support these features,but if they do, all you need to do is spend some time with the user's manual andyou'll be ready to use your phone as an extension of your office.

    The T18LX'sNiMH battery is rated to last for a maximum of four hours digital talk time and80 hours digital standby time. In our testing, the phone held a call for 3.5hours, and ran for an impressive 95.75 hours in standby. The audible low-batteryalarm was loud enough for us to hear when the phone was about to die, and theincluded rapid charger brought the T18LX back to full power in just over onehour.

    With its ultracompact design, highly customizable call managementfeatures, and vibrating call alert, the Ericsson T18LX is well suited forfrequent travelers and those who need to manage a lot of names and numbers. Ifyou don't need advanced features like voice-activated dialing or Internetaccess, it's a solid choice. --Thom Arno, edited by Tom Mace

    Pros:

    • Efficient design and navigation
    • Highly personalized call management options
    • Built-in vibrating call alert

    Cons:

    • Tiny screen
    • Not Web-enabled

    How We Tested Battery Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phonebattery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables,including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency(including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, andbattery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handsetmanufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings,they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer tothe times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery liferanges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience atleast the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital andanalog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, asanalog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone.Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to themanufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phoneon, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and,when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook.When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when thephone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped thecalls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately andcontinued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged thebattery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength,this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting thatseveral phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers'ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established acarrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone everyfew hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out.Since no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because thephone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, againassuming consistent carrier signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • TDMA tri-mode technology
    • Protective flip keypad cover
    • Intuitive menus and call management features
    • Built-in vibrating call alert
    • Up to 4 hours digital talk time and 80 hours digital standby time; includes NiMH battery, rapid charger, and belt clip

    16. Motorola M3682 Prepaid Phone (T-Mobile)
    by Motorola
    list price: $79.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004W4BD
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Motorola
    Sales Rank: 6208
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    Although not exactly on the cutting edge, the reasonably priced Motorola M3682is a good choice for basic voice calls and two-way SMS text messaging. The M3682is a relatively bulky phone and lacks some desirable features such as voicedialing, voice memo recording, or vibration mode, but it does have better-than-averageuser interface and menus. The standard headset jack enables hands-freeoperation, and the M3682 is bundled with a hands-free headset.

    The M3682 is a single-band1,900 MHz GSM phone that, like allGSM phones, uses a removable SIM card to store your account information andphone number (our test phone was provisioned by VoiceStream Wireless). Weighing in at 6.2ounces, with standard NiMH battery included, the M3682 measures 5.4 by 1.9 by1.0 inches (not including its 1.25-inch stubby antenna), making it a relativelylarge, though still lightweight, phone. A flip cover protects the keypad, and itlets you view the backlit display, comprised of four 12-character lines and textplus status icons, and use the large control keys. The black case of the M3682doesn't feel as sturdy as other Motorola phones, but we had no problems whileusing it. Furthermore, the phone survived an inadvertent 3-foot drop onto acarpeted concrete floor.

    Left and right menu buttons activate the phone's menusystem, and an OK button, located just above the menu buttons, selects thecurrent option. The C button clears the last entry, and an up arrow buttonlaunches the icon-based quick access screen, which lets you quickly select fromnine common operations such as locking the phone, calling voice mail, or lookingup a name in your phone book. The phone has 12 ringer tones with a separatevolume control menu (no volume keys), but no vibration mode.

    The M3682's phonebook can be split between the phone and the SIM card, provided your carriersupports it. Up to 100 numbers can be stored in the phone, and potentially 55more numbers on a SIM card. Another 40 numbers can be stored in a restrictedcall list. In this mode, only the numbers on the list can be dialed. Enteringphone numbers is easy: just tap in the number and a unique descriptor, thenassign it to a memory location. The first nine memory locations can be dialedwith one touch--just tap and hold the respective key and the stored number isautomatically dialed.

    As with all GSM phones, the actual features that areusable in the M3682 depend on the carrier's provisioning via the SIM card. Intotal, the Motorola M3682 supports caller ID, call forwarding, caller on hold,and conference calling for up to two other people. Two-way SMS text messaging with aselectable cell broadcast mode to receive alerts and notices from outsidesources is also featured.

    Security features for the M3682 include phone lockand selective call barring of incoming and outgoing calls (if supported by thecarrier). You can also block your caller ID information from showing up on acall recipient's phone.

    Since it lacks an infrared port, the only way to usethe M3682 with a PC or other device is via an optional data cable. No softwareis included for synchronizing phone book numbers with a PC.

    The M3682's ratherlarge NiMH battery is rated for a maximum 210 minutes of digital talk time and105 hours of digital standby time. In testing, our sample phone held a call fornearly 210 minutes, and it lasted for 96 hours in standby mode. One of thephone's best features is its ability to use standard AA alkaline batteries,thanks to a special battery-compartment backing. You can also use single-uselithium-ion battery packs, but not rechargeable lithium-ion AA batteries.

    Abasic phone for ordinary users, the Motorola M3682 scores high marks in ease ofuse, but lacks desirable features such as voice dialing and vibration mode.

    --Testing and evaluation by Brown Consulting Associates, edited by Thom Arno

    Pros:

    • Low cost
    • Can use standard AA alkaline batteries
    • Intuitive menus and control buttons

    Cons:

    • No standard vibration mode
    • Not Web-enabled
    • Comparatively large

    How We Tested Battery Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phonebattery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables,including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency(including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, andbattery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handsetmanufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings,they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer tothe times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery liferanges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience atleast the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital andanalog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, asanalog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone.Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to themanufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phoneon, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and,when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook.When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when thephone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped thecalls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately andcontinued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged thebattery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength,this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting thatseveral phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers'ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established acarrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone everyfew hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out.Since no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because thephone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, againassuming consistent carrier signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • Flip cover protects keypad
    • Excellent menu buttons and navigation aids
    • Two-way SMS text messaging
    • Up to 180 minutes talk time, 180 hours standby time, with standard battery
    • Includes Jabra EarSet, NiMH battery, and charger; $50 worth of airtime included

    17. Samsung SCH8500 Phone, Charcoal Black (Sprint)
    by Samsung
    list price: $199.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004W4BH
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Samsung
    Sales Rank: 3997
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    If you need a phone as a constant, all-purpose digital communications companion, the Samsung SCH-8500 dual-band digital and analog phone is a strong candidate. It's small and light enough so you won't mind carrying it with you all the time, but its size belies its communications features and battery life. The display (which can show five lines of content), status icons, and smart key prompts, are well suited for Internet access or text messaging. When you add voice dialing and voice memo recording to the mix, the SCH-8500 stands out.

    The SCH-8500 is a clamshell flip phone that measures 3.3 by 2.1 by 1 inches (length by width by depth) with the cover closed, and the antenna measures 1-inch when collapsed. With battery, the phone weighs a light 5 ounces. This 800 MHz analog/1900 MHz CDMA digital phone has a rugged case with two-tone gray styling highlights. A dual-slot desktop charger is included, which is fine if you don't travel. But if you're on the road for more than a couple of days, you might consider springing for the optional and more portable travel charger.

    The flip cover contains the display and rubberized earpiece. When closed, it hides all the controls, except for a volume control toggle and voice memo start/stop button on the left side. The flip screen measures only 1.5 by 1 inches (width by height), but it does a fine job of displaying status icons, menus, and text. You navigate menus and text with four cursor buttons. Other control keys are labeled Menu, Talk, End, CLR and OK (with a envelope icon for checking messages). The rubberized keys are nearly flush with the phone's surface, so, while your fingers won't slide around, you do have to pay attention when hitting the keys. There are 13 ringer choices--nine tones and four melodies--plus a vibration mode for courtesy or discretion. Of the 229 possible phonebook entries, six can be set for speed-dial. The rest can be dialed with two-, three-, or four-touch dialing (you enter any four digits that appear consecutively in a phone number).

    If supported by your plan and carrier, the Samsung SCH-8500 supports caller ID, call waiting, call forwarding, one-way SMS text messaging, e-mail, voicemail alerts, and mobile Internet access (our Sprint PCS test phone included all these features). A minibrowser is also included, as well as a calendar, to-do list, calculator, and alarm clock with countdown feature.

    You can voice dial up to 20 phone-book numbers book just by hitting a hot key to access the carrier's voice-dialing support. This worked well, although it is technically a carrier feature rather than a feature of this phone. You can record four separate memos of 60 seconds each--just remember, since the microphone is covered by the cover, you need to flip it up to record a voice note or make a voice call.

    Security features in the SCH-8500 include phone and outgoing call locking. There's also a feature to completely erase your phone book and other personal information entries. While there is no infrared port, the serial port can be used with an optional data cable and software to transfer data to a PC, and to use the phone as a wireless modem.

    We were surprised and pleased when the SCH-8500 exceeded Samsung's rated maximum talk time. The lithium-ion battery is rated for a maximum 180 minutes, but in our connection test it ran for 220 minutes. Standby time, rated at 120 hours, tested for 102 hours. A dual-slot desktop charger is included with the phone.

    The compact Samsung SCH-8500 is packed with features for voice call management and messaging. Better-than-average battery talk time and wireless Web access and an impressive display make it a good choice for busy professionals. --Testing and evaluation by Brown Consulting Associates, edited by Thom Arno

    Pros:

    • Strong battery performance in talk-time testing
    • Compact and lightweight
    • Clear, moderate-sized screen for messaging and Internet access
    • Fully featured for voice calls and communications tasks

    Cons:

    • Compact travel charger not included

    How We Tested Battery-Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phone battery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables, including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency (including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, and battery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handset manufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings, they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer to the times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery life ranges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience at least the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital and analog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, as analog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone. Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to the manufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phone on, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and, when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook. When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when the phone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped the calls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately and continued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged the battery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength, this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting that several phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers' ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established a carrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone every few hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out. Since no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because the phone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, again assuming consistent carrier signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • Dual-mode for widest coverage
    • Better-than-rated talk time
    • Voice dialing and voice-memo recording
    • Features a calendar, to-do list, alarm clock, and phone book
    • Compact and lightweight

    18. Ericsson LX700 Prepaid Phone (AT&T)
    by Ericsson
    list price: $79.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004W4BI
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Ericsson
    Sales Rank: 5909
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    If convenience and security are your paramount interests, and you don't need aphone for heavy messaging or business use, the Ericsson LX700 is worth checkingout. This dual-band, dual-mode TDMA phone may lack Internet access and otheradvanced features, but it's a rugged, solidly constructed handset with decentcall management features, dual NAM capabilities, and an attractive price.

    TheLX700 measures 5.1 by 1.9 by 0.75 inches and weighs 7.8 ounces, which is somewhat biggerand heftier than average. The active flip keypad cover makes it easy to answerand terminate calls. The backlit display can show up to three lines and 12characters per line, and the full set of indicators keep you in step with thephone's status. The flashing red/green indicator lights show when the phone isin standby mode, when a call is coming in, and when the battery is charging orlow. The LX700 features Ericsson's intuitive yes/no button navigation with upand down arrows for scrolling through menu options and call logs.

    Built-infeatures such as 20-number incoming and outgoing call lists, 17 ringer options,99 speed-dial locations, one-button dialing for up to nine phone book numbers,two separate credit card dialing locations, and a series of call timers help youmanage your calls and contacts. The scratchpad lets you temporarily store aphone number while you're on a call. Furthermore, the LX700 has short messagingservice (SMS) and fax capabilities, with one-button callback for numbersembedded in text messages. SMS is a handy feature; we used our sample phone(provisioned by AT&T Wireless), to lets friends know we'd be late for anappointment. While it's not as advanced as e-mail, SMS is just as useful in mostsituations. And, provided your service plan supports it, LX700 offers caller ID,call forwarding, call waiting, and other popular call management services.

    Onthe connectivity front, the LX700 will synch with Ericsson's own phone bookmanager accessory, as well as other PIMs. While the LX700 isn't exactly designedfor high-end business use, it's a lot easier to manage your phone book andcontact lists on the PC rather than trying to enter text on the phone.

    TheLX700 is equipped with standard security features: a personal security code,keypad lock, selectable outgoing and incoming call restrictions, a secret phonebook memory, and authentication capability, which prevents airtime fraud. And, if your service plan supports it, you can take advantage of the LX700's voiceencryption capabilities, which adds an extra layer of protection and privacy toyour conversations.

    Our sample's battery performance was admirable. The NiMHbattery achieved three hours digital talk time and 57 hours digital standbytime, which matched up with Ericsson's ratings.

    While the LX700 isn't the mostadvanced phone around, it's an adequate, straightforward unit that can serve asan emergency or backup phone. If you simply want to make voice calls and sendtext messages, the LX700 can deftly handle both functions. --Thom Arno,edited by Tom Mace

    Pros:

    • Attractive price
    • 200-name phone book
    • Dual NAM capability

    Cons:

    • Bulky construction
    • Not Web-enabled

    How We Tested Battery Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phonebattery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables,including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency(including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, andbattery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handsetmanufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings,they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer tothe times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery liferanges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience atleast the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital andanalog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, asanalog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone.Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to themanufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phoneon, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and,when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook.When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when thephone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped thecalls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately andcontinued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged thebattery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength,this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting thatseveral phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers'ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established acarrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone everyfew hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out.Since no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because thephone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, againassuming consistent carrier signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • Tri-mode technology
    • Quick-flip keypad cover
    • 200-name phone book
    • Data/fax transmission
    • Up to 3 hours talk, 57 hours standby time

    19. Sprint PCS Touchpoint 2200 Phone (Sprint)
    by Sprint PCS
    list price: $149.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004Y884
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Sprint PCS
    Sales Rank: 4004
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    With wireless Internet access, a built-in voice memo recorder, voice-activated dialing, and easy-to-follow menus with screen prompts, the Touchpoint 2200 packs plenty of functionality into a moderately sized phone. Its dual-band, dual-mode CDMA technology will let you place and receive calls in most areas of the United States.

    At 4.8 by 2.0 by 0.8 inches and weighing a mere 4.5 ounces, the 2200 is well balanced and highly portable. Overall, this is a rugged and refreshingly simple phone with a standard 2.5-millimeter headset jack, 30 distinctive ringer types, including vibration mode, three recordable ringers and three custom ringer settings. The enhanced phone book offers 120 storage locations, and each entry can hold up to nine phone numbers. A call-history feature logs the last 10 each incoming, outgoing, and missed calls.

    A large navigation button, the Mouse key, provides four-way screen and menu navigation. Two additional navigation controls, marked OK and CLR, are positioned on the left and right of the Mouse key, respectively. The "1" key performs double duty as a message key: You hold it down to access your voice mail (assuming your carrier and plan provide this service). Rubberized volume control keys are located on the left side, and the large backlit screen has a generous display area with an eye-pleasing font.

    The 2200 provides good support for Sprint PCS's voice-activated control features. We easily set up voice tags for 30 friends and associates, all of whom we could dial by voice command. We never had trouble getting the phone to recognize names, and once we set up voice tags, all we needed to do was press the Voice Services key, speak the name of the person we wanted to call, and the 2200 handled the rest.

    The voice memo recorder was just as useful. Instead of scrambling for Post-its or hauling out our PDA, we saved our to-do lists, important numbers, and reminders in the 2200's memory. An added bonus: When playing messages back, you have the option of listening to them over the earpiece or the main speaker. You can even record and attach a voice ringer to any number in voice-dial memory. This was a little tricky to figure out, but we never had to crack the owner's manual for assistance.

    The Touchpoint 2200 supports such carrier-dependent services as caller ID, call waiting, voice-mail alerts, three-way calling, e-mail, SMS text messaging, and wireless Internet access. Web navigation was incredibly seamless, and the minibrowser has direct access to many popular sites as well as updates on the latest news, sports, weather, and financial information.

    While the Touchpoint 2200 won't replace your Palm Organizer or Pocket PC, it can store 100 appointments, 15 alarms, and 20 to-do items. If you buy an optional data kit, you can use the phone as a digital modem for PCs or download crucial PIM data from your computer. The minibrowser takes advantage of the generous screen space to display more menu items and text than most Web-enabled phones do. The phone also has a built-in calculator function and three games: Football, Dice, and Blackjack.

    Security features include phone locking, restricted incoming calls, restricted outgoing calls (with three special memory spots for exceptions), phone-book erase, and full reset mode, which erases personal information in all applications.

    During battery testing, we were happily surprised when the 2200's lithium-ion battery, which, though rated for a maximum 210 minutes of digital talk time, held a connection for 235 minutes. The rated 200 hours of digital standby time rating proved to be an impressive 205 in testing (see "How We Tested Battery Talk/Standby Time" below).

    While not the sleekest or fanciest digital Internet-enabled phone, the Touchpoint 2200 is, in many ways, one of the best designed. The combination of a great screen, simple keys and intelligent menus makes for a fast learning curve.

    --Testing and evaluation by Brown Consulting Associates, edited by Thom Arno

    Pros:

    • Voice-activated dialing
    • Voice memo recorder
    • Incredible functionality
    • Better-than-expected talk time

    Cons:

    • None

    How We Tested Battery Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phone battery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables, including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency (including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, and battery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handset manufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings, they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer to the times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery life ranges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience at least the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital and analog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, because analog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital mode talk and standby times with each phone. Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to the manufacturer's directions. To test digital phone talk time, we turned the phone on, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and, when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook. When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when the phone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped the calls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately and continued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged the battery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier signal strength, this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting that several phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers' ratings.

    To test digital phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established a carrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone every few hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out. Because no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because the phone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, again assuming consistent carrier signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • Web enabled
    • Voice-activated dialing and voice memo recorder
    • Large seven-line display
    • Up to 210 minutes digital talk time and 200 hours digital standby time
    • Weighs 4.5 ounces with standard battery; includes Lithium-ion battery and desktop charger

    20. Ericsson R280LX Phone (AT&T)
    by Ericsson
    list price: $99.99
    (price subject to change: see help)
    Asin: B00004W4BO
    Catlog: Wireless
    Manufacturer: Ericsson
    Sales Rank: 3625
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

    Amazon.com

    While some of today's wireless phones emphasize style over substance, theEricsson R280LX strikes a comfortable balance between user-friendlyfunctionality and a subtly stylish look.

    Out of the box, the phone was a snapto use. The R280LX rests comfortably in the hand, and its ergonomic design letus easily hold and dial it one-handed. The sturdy rubberized keypad, logical keylayout, and backlit five-line LCD screen (four text lines) provided for a nice feel and veryintuitive use. We rarely needed to look at the manual, a rarity in these days ofincreasingly complex phone interfaces. The onscreen tutorial and preprogrammedhelp features were up to answering any questions we had.

    One of the R280LX'snicest aspects is its selection of personalization options. After all, who wantsa phone that's just like all the others? We were able to customize the displaytext and easily add favorite Web sites to the minibrowser. You not only haveseveral ring tones to choose from, you can even write your own. We had notrouble programming in our favorite Mudhoney song, as the keypad can work as amusical keyboard, sharps and flats included. Very impressive, and trulyentertaining.

    Fun aside, the R280LX is loaded with useful features for homeand work, including easy-to-use voice mail, a 400-number phone book, caller ID(which stores the incoming number for quick one-key redial), a built-in clockwith an alarm feature (perfect for important reminders), text messaging withspace to store 30 messages, and a minibrowser to access the Web (you will needAT&T Wireless' PocketNet service).

    We were able to send and receive text e-mailsbeautifully, even if typing with the phone keypad took a bit of practice. The e- mail option is simple to use, and highly convenient. (And we found ourselvesmissing it terribly after completing the testing for this review.) Web browsingwent smoothly, although it wasn't easy to locate the menu option for typing in aURL of our choice. This was surprising given the user-friendliness of most otherfeatures.

    We tested sound quality in a wide range of circumstances. During aWho concert, we called friends and our own voice mail to share the songs, withwonderfully clear results. A phone call in a crowded elevator with the volumeselect on the lowest level also produced clear and precise sound, withoutletting others hear what the caller was saying.

    We did have a few smallquibbles. Weighing in at 6.1 ounces, this phone is not so heavy that you'll wantto skip your workout, but it does have a bit more heft than many others on themarket. Also, we occasionally found ourselves having to press keys more thanonce to enter a number or an option.

    The battery life--which averaged aroundthree hours of talk time, and 96 hours of standby time--is somewhat less than weexpected. Furthermore, time spent surfing the Web drained battery reserves quitequickly. The phone does come equipped with a rapid charger, which can fullycharge the battery in a little over an hour, but lugging it around could be apain if you travel a lot. Finally, the plastic interface that connects thecharger to the phone was a bit flimsy.

    These concerns aside, the EricssonR280LX is a great, reasonably priced companion for anyone who wants a business- capable phone that's also lots of fun to use. --Heather Campbell

    Pros:

    • Intuitive menus for easy navigation and option selection
    • Web-browser enabled
    • Phone book, faxing, and e-mail features perfect for business use
    • Excellent sound quality in a wide range of conditions
    • Many customization options

    Cons:

    • Slightly heavier than comparable phones
    • Keypad a bit sticky at times
    • Less battery longevity than expected

    How We Tested Battery-Talk/Standby Time

    When reading our reviews, you should view the test results of mobile-phone battery talk time and standby time as relative information only. Many variables, including carrier signal strength at your location, signal consistency (including incoming and outgoing calls), display and ringer settings, and battery charging methods and history, will affect performance. When handset manufacturers and mobile phone carriers list talk-time and standby-time ratings, they usually include disclaimers about variable performance and often refer to the times they publish as maximum times. Some quote expected battery life ranges, and in this case you're probably safe to assume you'll experience at least the minimum rated range. Note that manufacturers of dual-mode digital and analog handsets publish battery-life rates for both digital and analog modes, as analog mode consumes much more power than digital mode.

    Our Tests: We tested digital-mode talk and standby times with each phone. Prior to each test, we fully charged the phone's battery according to the manufacturer's directions. To test digital-phone talk time, we turned the phone on, established a digital carrier signal, dialed a number in our test lab, and, when the call rang through, took the receiving phone's handset off the hook. When all went well, we didn't do anything else except record the time when the phone died. In a couple of cases, the phones lost the signal and dropped the calls. If we were right there and could redial, we did so immediately and continued running the test. Otherwise, we halted the test, recharged the battery, and started the test over. Assuming consistent carrier-signal strength, this test should represent best-case talk time. And it's worth noting that several phones' talk-time performance significantly exceeded the manufacturers' ratings.

    To test digital-phone standby time, we turned the phone on, established a carrier signal, and left the phone in standby mode. We checked the phone every few hours (for what was often days on end) until the phone finally cut out. Since no outgoing or incoming calls occurred during testing and because the phone was not moved, this method should represent best-case standby time, again assuming consistent carrier signal strength. ... Read more

    Features

    • Web enabled
    • Full range of call-management features
    • 400-name phone book
    • Attractive silver-alloy finish
    • Up to three hours of talk time and 160 hours of standby time with standard battery

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